Loma Linda University Health Diabetes Prevention Program Merits CDC Recognition

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Loma Linda University Health Diabetes Prevention Program Merits CDC Recognition

Award reinforces partnership between community and institution working to prevent or delay type 2 diabetes.

 

Loma Linda University Medical Center’s Diabetes Treatment Center was recently awarded the prestigious Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recognition for a quality diabetes prevention program, a designation that underscores the facility’s expertise in delivering a proven diabetes prevention lifestyle changes for patients.

 

The recognition affirms the center’s ability to help patients make lifestyle changes designed to help them lose weight, reduce blood glucose levels and control triglycerides and cholesterol.

 

“The whole person care model we’ve been able to promote has been incredible,” said Holly Craig-Buckholtz, manager of the Diabetes Treatment Center. “We love being a part of something that changes lives right before our eyes.”

 

A CDC-recognized lifestyle change program is an evidence-based solution that can reduce a person’s risk of developing type 2 diabetes by 58% (71% in individuals aged 65 and older), according to the CDC’s website.

 

CDC-recognized diabetes prevention lifestyle change programs can help people prevent or delay type 2 diabetes and improve their overall health. Lifestyle change programs can also reduce the risk of heart attack and stroke associated with prediabetes and improve participants’ overall health.

 

The program facilitators are Ernie Medina, DrPh, associate professor at the School of Public Health, and Michael Paalani, DrPh, assistant professor at the School of Public Health. The classes are held under the supervision of Holly Craig-Buckholtz, MBA, manager of the Diabetes Treatment Center, and Kevin Codorniz, MD, medical director and chief of endocrinology, diabetes and metabolism. The diabetes education is led by Margarete Carnerio and Julie Pimentel.

 

“This recognition validates our goal to help patients with diabetes to return to living full and active lifestyles, and it encourages us to continue the work we’re doing with patients and their families,” Craig-Buckholtz said.

Editorial Note: This article was originally published on the Loma Linda University News site. It has been republished here with permission.

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