100 Years Ago Today: Ellen G. White’s Funeral

100 Years Ago Today: Ellen G. White’s Funeral

When Ellen White died in July 1915, three funerals and a graveside service memorialized her life of ministry. An estimated 5,400 people attended these services. The first funeral was held July 18 on the lawn at her home in California, known as Elmshaven. A second was held the next day in Oakland, California. The third and largest service was held o

GC Session 2015: North American Perspectives

GC Session 2015: North American Perspectives

This second perspectives article focuses on the North American Division and the particular challenges it faces following the 60th General Conference Session. Given the split opinions on various issues, the conversation going on in the NAD may pioneer a way forward for the global church community. As we continue wrestling with our differences, we in

GC Session 2015: Perspectives from Around the World

GC Session 2015: Perspectives from Around the World

No venue makes more apparent the extent of diversity in the Seventh-day Adventist Church than the quinquennial worldwide meetings—the General Conference Session. As we rub shoulders with each other for days in a row; as we take in known, shared, cherished beliefs in unknown, singular sounds; as we observe the obvious external differences such as sk

What Do Adventists Believe Now?

What Do Adventists Believe Now?

Last week the General Conference (GC) in session approved numerous edits to the Seventh-day Adventist Church’s statement of fundamental beliefs. Since the Adventist Church website has not yet posted the updated document, we’ve combed through the session proceedings to bring you an unofficial version of the new wording. (Update – Dec. 14, 2015: The

Curing Sadventism, Part 3: The Punch Line

Curing Sadventism, Part 3: The Punch Line

In an essay published in 1967 Walter Wagoner pondered America’s “folksy and largely uncritical denominationalism” whose Christianity reflected a “less than maturity in matters satire.” Acknowledging that religious satire must “run an extraordinarily delicate course,” he considers it essential for handling the “idolatries of the godly”—which can uni