The Compass Headlines 07-27-2017

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The Compass Headlines 07-27-2017

Are we Guilty of Capricious Compassion?

Ever been on a short-term mission trip overseas? Richard Stearns sees this as “capricious compassion” and argues for longterm focus to ensure true transformation. For your church’s next mission-trip, ask if there are coordinated and sustained efforts to ensure longterm changes in the community you are about to reach. Read Richard Stearns article here.

The Death of Reading is Threatening the Soul

How many books have you read so far this year in 2017? “…a commitment to reading is an going battle” concluded Philip Yancey. The author highlights one of the most challenging issue facing our generation—a lack of reading. The age of internet has ushered in many good things, but it has also made us lazy readers. Read Phillip Yancey’s article here.

 

Are Students Better Off Without Laptops in the Classroom?

According to a new study by science at Michigan State University,

“laptops do not enhance classroom learning, and in fact students would be better off leaving their laptops in the dorm during class. Although computer use during class may create the illusion of enhanced engagement with course content, it more often reflects engagement with social media, YouTube videos, instant messaging, and other nonacademic content. This self-inflicted distraction comes at a cost, as students are spending up to one-third of valuable (and costly) class time zoned out, and the longer they are online the more their grades tend to suffer.”

Read more here.

Are Race Relations Within the Church Hurting Ourselves and our Witness?

A Southern Baptist Convention (SBC) pastor decided to leave the SBC over what he claims to be a treatment of black people. We invite you to read his reason for leaving and send us your comments. Do black and white conferences in the Seventh-day Adventist Church in North America hurt us and hinder our witness? Read Lawrence Ware’s departure from the SBC here.

Catholic Church Hierarchy Makes it Hard to Punish Sexual Abusers

For decades now, the Catholic Church has faced many legal fights over many sexual abuse scandals. Cardinal George Pell, the third highest ranking person in the Catholic Church, recently returned to Australia to face charges over sexual assault. Given his profile, international observers are keen to see what would be the outcome of this case. Will the church settle as it has done in the past or will there be a different outcome? Unless the church changes its structure and hierarchy, she will continue to face many of these challenges where lower subordinates cannot report on their superiors. Read more here.

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About the author

Valmy Karemera is associate editor of The Compass Magazine and posts daily news updates on the Compass Twitter page. Originally from Rwanda, he now lives and works in Texas with his family.