The Compass Headlines 08-27-2017

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The Compass Headlines 08-27-2017

Don’t Skip Breakfast!

A report by The New York Times published observations made about Adventists’ healthy lifestyle. The Times wrote,

“A recent review of the dietary patterns of 50,000 adults who are Seventh Day Adventists over seven years provides the latest evidence suggesting that we should front-load our calories early in the day to jump-start our metabolisms and prevent obesity, starting with a robust breakfast and tapering off to a smaller lunch and light supper, or no supper at all.”

Moreover, it was found that “Fasting signals to the body to start burning stores of fat for fuel,” the researchers said. “’It seems our bodies are built to feast and fast,’” said Dr. Hana Kahleova, one of the authors of the study, which was done by researchers at Loma Linda University School of Public Health in California and published in The Journal of Nutrition in July. “’It needs some regular cycling between having food intake and fasting. This seems to be hard-wired.’”

 

The Persistence of Guilty and the Need for the Gospel

As Western culture seeks ways to put the final nail in the coffin of a Judeo-Christian worldview, the problem of guilt looms large. Writing in The Hedgehog Review, Wilfred M. McClay, perceptively argues,

Those who have viewed the obliteration of religion, and particularly of Judeo-Christian metaphysics, as the modern age’s signal act of human liberation need to reconsider their dogmatic assurance on that point. Indeed, the persistent problem of guilt may open up an entirely different basis for reconsidering the enduring claims of religion. Perhaps human progress cannot be sustained without religion, or something like it, and specifically without something very like the moral economy of sin and absolution that has hitherto been secured by the religious traditions of the West.

Screen Time and Depression Among Teens

In the September issue of The Atlantic, psychologist Jean M. Twenge observed a relationship between depression and teens using smartphones. She writes,

The correlation between depression and smartphone use are strong enough to suggest that more parents should be telling their kids to put down their phone. As the technology writer Nick Bilton has reported, it’s a policy some Silicon Valley executives follow. Even Steve Jobs limited his kids’ use of the devices he brought into the world. What’s at stake isn’t just how kids experience adolescence. The constant presence of smartphones is likely to affect them well into adulthood. Among people who suffer an episode of depression, at least half become depressed again later in life. Adolescence is a key time for developing social skills; as teens spend less time with their friends face-to-face, they have fewer opportunities to practice them. In the next decade, we may see more adults who know just the right emoji for a situation, but not the right facial expression.

The World Economic Forum published the image below to highlight the effects of smartphone light on our brains:

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About the author

Valmy Karemera is associate editor of The Compass Magazine and posts daily news updates on the Compass Twitter page. Originally from Rwanda, he now lives and works in Texas with his family.